What's On in March

A double whammy of lecturer strikes across many universities this month and disruption caused by 'the Beast from the East' means that lots of events have been cancelled or postponed but there are still plenty of exciting, research-orientated events taking place around the country. Here are some of the events that have particularly caught my eye.


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140 Years of Recorded Sound            1st March - May 2018, British Library

Just how important have the sounds of the past 140 years been to our lives? Dive into the British Library sound archive in our free exhibition looking at the significance of sound since the phonograph was invented in 1877.


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 Artificial Intelligence and Systemic Risk    6th March, 6.30 - 8pm, LSE

With Artificial Intelligence overtaking human intelligence at driving cars and outplaying it at games, is the financial system next? Will AI stabilise or destabilise the financial system? Might AI even cause a systemic financial crisis?


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Future of Your Genetic Health            7th March, 6.30 - 8pm, Royal Society

'Personalised medicine is quickly moving from the realm of science fiction to everyday healthcare, whilst scientific ability to alter human genetics is growing every year, raising a range of ethical issues. How do we make sure that these developments are equally shared across society? What measures can be put in place to prevent patients being unfairly penalised for having certain genes?

Join our expert panel as we discuss the medical and ethical implications of these new genetic technologies. The panel will include:

  • Dr Robin Lovell-Badge CBE FRS, Stem Cell Geneticist, The Francis Crick Institute
  • Dr Sarah Chan, Public Health Ethicist, The University of Edinburgh
  • Dr Andrea Nemeth, Consultant in Neurogenetics at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust'

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British Science Week                       9th - 18th March, across the UK

British Science Week is a ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths - featuring fascinating, entertaining and engaging events and activities across the UK for people of all ages. It looks like there are going to be about 1000 individual events happening across the country, so way too many to mention here but click on the link above to find out what's happening in your area.


And It Was Good: Thinking theologically about evolution  Saturday 10th March, 2pm, St Paul’s Cathedral

I'm slightly obsessed by this topic at the moment as I've been working on a short film about people's perceptions of science, religion and evolution. It's a fascinating area and one that's often fraught with misunderstanding, based an the misplaced assumption that religion and science are, and always have been, locked in irrevocable conflict. This talk, given by Revd. Michael Reiss, promises to explore some interesting questions that should interest people from all sides of the spectrum.


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The Reconstruction of Richard III’s Face                                         Monday 12th March, 11am, Richard III Visitor’s Centre, Leicester

As part of its 'The Science of Richard III' series for Science Week, the Visitor Centre is hosting a series of expert speakers who were each part of the team that analysed the remains of ‘Skeleton 1’.

Students will have the chance to hear first-hand about the exciting work that took place behind the scenes after the archaeological dig in the car park. In this talk, Professor Caroline Wilkinson will explain the facial reconstruction process, and how she recreated the face of Richard III.


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Food Futures?                          Saturday 17th March, 10am - 5pm, Calthorpe Project, London

A one-day hands-on workshop with academics and artists from the Slade School of Art, UCL on the theme of food production, sustainability and closing the energy loop. You will have the opportunity to join an experiment to test a hydroponic plant machine, originally devised by NASA and make your own vegetarian closed loop sausages.


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Building and Dwelling: Ethics for the City w/ Richard Sennett                Tuesday 20th, 6.30 - 8pm, LSE

To celebrate the launch of his new book, Richard Sennett, Professor of Sociology at LSE and one of the world’s leading thinkers about the urban environment draws on his intimate engagement with city life to form a bold and original vision for the future of cities.


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Peter Barker runs Orinoco Communications, a digital communications company specialising in helping research groups from science, the social sciences and the humanities to bring their research alive and engage with the public.

E. peter@orinococomms.com